Trauma Sensitive Yoga

December Calendar of Events

Holiday Hours:
Sunday, December 24, Christmas Eve: Closed
Monday, December 25, Christmas: Closed (except for Christmas Day Practice)
December 26 -- January 1: Holiday Break*
*No regularly scheduled open classes
*See schedule for special scheduled classes or workshops
*Short North Boutique limited hours:
December 26: 11a to 5p
December 27: 11a to 8p
December 28: 11a to 8p
December 29: 11a to 8p
December 30: 11a to 8p
December 31: 11a to 3p
January 1: 8:30a to 3p
January 1: New Year’s Day Classes
January 2: Open Class Schedule Resumes

Schedule Updates:
Grandview:
Thursday 12p Deep Release with Amy Lybrook
Saturday 11:45a Slow Flow Level 1 & 2 with Amy Lybrook

Workshops:
December 2 Sekoia Journey to Wellness Retreat Workshop with Karine Wascher
December 8-10 Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Training Michele Vinbury, Marybeth Hamilton, Marcia Miller
December 8 Ayurvedic Foundations with Breanna Mustard
December 9 Holiday Restorative with Marcia Miller
December 21 Holiday Restorative with Jenn Gebhart
December 17 Sekoia Aerial Restoratives with Dale Ann Gray
December 25 Christmas Day Practice with Lara Falberg at Grandview
January 1 New Year’s Day Classes:
9:00a to 11:00a NYD Mysore with Linda Chun & Correna Starbuck
10:00a to 12:00p NYD Hatha with Marcia Miller
11:00a to 12:45a NYD Sekoia Hike with Michele Vinbury at Offsite TBD
1:00p to 2:30p NYD Sekoia with Karine Wascher
4:00p to 5:30p NYD Vinyasa with Jeremy Grace at Grandview

Series Classes:
Upcoming January 2018 Series Classes click here

Upcoming Teacher Trainings:

200 Hour 9-Month Yoga Teacher Training (2018 March Weekend)
This program starts in March and meets one weekend a month. Additionally, the program includes a weekend orientation session to start the program, a philosophy weekend and a three-day silent retreat to finish.

**Save $500 if enrolled and paid in full by December 23, 2017. **

200 Hour TT Free Information Sessions:
Sunday, December 3rd from 11:45a to 12:30p at Yoga on High -- Short North
Wednesday, January 17th from 6:00p to 6:45p at Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute
Sunday, January 21st from 11:45a to 12:30p at Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

Pranayama Teacher Training with Linda Oshins
This seven-month training involves telephone conference calls every other week, one weekend workshop mid-way through the training, and one weekend workshop at the end. Program kicks off with a choice of phone calls, February 7 or 11, 2018.

Ayurveda Health Educator 1 (2018 March Evening Program)
The evening program is 11-months long from March 10, 2018 -- February 26, 2019. It meets Tuesdays from 6:00p-9:00p and includes three full weekend modules.

Ayurveda Program Free Information Sessions:
December 14, 2017 at 6:30p -- Conference Call
January 13, 2018 from 12:15p to 1:15p at the Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

300 Hour Teacher Training
1 to 3 Year Customizable Program and Rolling Enrollment
For questions or more information contact: linda@yogaonhigh.com

300 Hr TT Free Information Sessions:
Saturday, January 20th from 2:30p to 3:30p at the Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

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Songs of Wholeness in Women’s Prison

Women'sPrisonProgramShall I write about their crimes? Their gross errors in judgment? Poor timing? Bad luck? Shall I tell stories of the children they cannot mother? The families left behind?   Perhaps I should write about their suffering, the trauma, the dysfunction that has, without exception, helped to land them here – sitting in this circle with me – behind bars. As I begin to teach, fluorescent lights hum, and from outside the door, sounds of shuffling feet and voices mix with the loud static discharge of handheld radios and the metallic rattle of keys.   The dissonance of sounds in this place, ubiquitous. Never a moment’s rest.

I sit in this circle every Friday with the women prisoners. In a make-shift classroom that serves as our yoga and mediation studio. Some are here for months, some for years, some for the rest of their lives.

Read More…

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EMBER Series – A Social Worker’s Review 

Alana Becker Photograph

Alana Becker Photograph

Working for a number of years in the mental health field with those who have experienced trauma has allowed me to develop a greater understanding of the scope of treatment needs, as well as approaches, that work for survivors. After having the opportunity to participate in the EMBER series with Michele Vinbury through Yoga on High, I would highly recommend it as part of a treatment plan for anyone recovering from trauma, and as an adjunct to other treatment modalities.

The EMBER series incorporates approaches including body movement, mindfulness skills, distress tolerance and emotion regulation, all of which have documented benefits in mental health treatment. The most current research is showing us how the body and the brain are directly impacted by trauma, and provides support for the incorporation of movement and mindfulness to traditional therapy approaches. The creation of a mentally and physically safe place through the EMBER program allows participants to explore being in one’s own body. Particularly for the trauma survivor, this is no small task. The practice of this type of purposeful, mindful, body awareness is an imperative aspect of the healing process.

More traditional talk therapy approaches to managing symptoms stemming from trauma are a beneficial and often necessary part of a trauma survivor’s healing journey. However, with research indicating that the brain and the body quite literally hold traumatic events, the importance of re-connecting with the body and addressing trauma in the brain becomes more apparent. The use of mindfulness and grounding techniques in the EMBER series create a foundation for this deeper level of healing to occur.

Visit Yoga on High to sign up for our next EMBER series.  Sliding scale payment options available to those in need through the Yoga on High Foundation.

Michelle Dismore is a licensed social worker and clinician working for a private non-profit organization in Columbus, Ohio. She obtained her B.A. in Psychology with a minor in Sociology, and a Master of Social Work degree from The Ohio State University. Michelle has experience providing therapy and interventions with children, adolescents and families across multiple levels of care including residential, intensive community based, and outpatient settings. Her approach in working with clients combines elements of mindfulness, regulating approaches and whole body awareness.

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Yoga & Trauma

My first experience with EMBER Yoga was over a year ago. I asked the Ember yoga instructor, Michele, kind of tongue and cheek, if she would teach me how to do a headstand. It was at that time that my whole life had changed. I know, I know, this sounds too cliché. My life now is learning to embrace being present through yoga movements. With this presence, I am also learning to cope with past traumas, and I am now looking forward to a future. I never thought I could live a life that I would enjoy.

With the EMBER series and Ashtanga Beginner class, I noticed that I felt included. Michele always ask us if we had any questions, comments, or concerns. Well, yeah. We’re doing yoga, right? I would practice what I learned in class, but couldn’t do it like I did just a couple hours beforehand. I was told patience, everybody is overwhelmed, and learning yoga can take lifetimes. My questions weren’t ignored or not heard. Different. Like, I mattered.

Okay, now the tough part. The triggers. I remembered specifically that Michele said that yoga is sometimes weird. I think at that particular time she was talking about the Ujjayi breathing technique. I admitted to her that I felt I was not able to stay present hearing this breathing. She said that voicing my concern was appropriate and she would help me stay present and would give me some reminders on how I could do this on my own.

During my struggles to stay present, I noticed that within these classes I felt safe. This took some time. At the end of each class, when we would do the Savasana, I am not sure why, but in both of these classes, sometimes, tears would roll down my cheeks. This was a pretty new experience for me. Didn’t understand how this was to be, the absorption of what I just learned had turned to tears.

As in other parts of my life, I started to make goals, challenges, for a yoga future beyond the six weeks series. I really did want to learn to stand on my head. Michele sent me an article on how to build up strength by doing the dolphin pose after teaching it in class one day. I read the article and looked at the pictures and got on my mat. I got my butt up in the air and I immediately broke down and started to cry. It was at this very time I learned about acceptance. I finally accepted the sexual assault. I accepted that I was not strong enough to do a headstand NOW, but I would work on this endeavor so maybe in a month or so, I could be closer to having my feet up in the air.

I can now talk about what happened to me. I don’t have to be strong enough. I don’t have to be anything enough. I just…be present.

Laurie R.

Michele Vinbury, lead instructor in the Ember program, in headstand.

Michele Vinbury, lead instructor and co-creator of the EMBER program, in headstand.

The EMBER classes are sponsored by the Yoga on High Foundation. For more information on the Foundation, please click here.

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EMBER Series – A Survivor’s Experience

Alana Becker Photography

Alana Becker Photography

Looking back, I don’t think there was anyway I could have known how powerful the EMBER series would be for me. The freeing emotional release I experienced moved me in ways traditional therapy hasn’t in years. I was amazed to begin a process of re-discovering my body, and what it means to be really in it. After spending so much time zoned out from my body and my life, the power of the restorative poses has healed me in ways words cannot adequately describe. To engage with the idea that I can create feelings of safety and comfort for my own body speaks to a level of self-empowerment I have only dreamed of before. Michele has an innate capacity to create a safe place from which healing grows. Read More…

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