Prenatal Yoga Teacher Training

Shitali: Cooling Breath

Many pregnant women feel nauseous at some time during their pregnancy. Shitali (Cooling Breath) can be very helpful in alleviating this miserable symptom. As the name implies, you can also use this breath practice to cool the body, and, for many, it alleviates or eliminates nausea. It may even prove beneficial in labor, as some women will get nauseous or very hot in labor.

JennG_ShitaliCurl the tongue or make an “O” shape with your lips and inhale over the tongue. After inhaling, the mouth and exhale through the nose. You can repeat this as often as you feel the need.

Jenn Gebhart teacher prenatal classes and is one of two co-authors of the Yoga on High Prenatal Teacher Training course. As you can see, the tips and techniques in that teacher training are not all asana-based. For more information on the teacher training, click here. And for a full bio of Jenn, click here.

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Prenatal Yoga

People come to yoga for various reasons. Many come for relief from physical pain, to increase strength, gain better balance, improve their posture and learn how to relax. It’s never very long before they discover that these goals and many others are fulfilled. Women often begin yoga when they are pregnant for these very reasons. The pregnant body is changing rapidly, sometimes what feels like wildly, and finding a way to rest comfortably helps women process and integrate these changes. At Yoga on High, the prenatal yoga curriculum not only includes various breath and asana practices to support the pregnant body, but it focuses specifically on helping women develop and maintain healthy, sustainable posture.

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Offering Prenatal Support through Yoga

by Jennifer Gebhart

Teaching Prenatal Yoga allows you the opportunity to empower women during this special and sacred time of their life. Pregnancy can create a flurry of emotions due to the physical changes it involves as well as fears about the baby’s health, laboring and mothering. As a yoga teacher you can offer a sacred space for the pregnant woman to slow down, tune into her body, and build a community of support. You can teach her ways to find comfort and ease in her changing body, while celebrating the life she is creating. Often women turn to yoga for the first time while pregnant because other forms of physical activity become too challenging and they hear how Prenatal Yoga offers them a time to bond with the baby and tools for labor. To avoid feeling isolated pregnant women can connect with one another is Prenatal Yoga classes, too. I’ve had many Prenatal Yoga Class students stay connected with one another, even after having their second children. What a gift this is in our fast paced, detached society. Read More…

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Supporting the Prenatal Experience

by Mary Sinclair

This is my 11thyear teaching prenatal yoga at Yoga on High and I find the spectrum of my experience fascinating! My teaching style continually evolves due to all I learn along the way. Being on the prenatal yoga scene is a surefire way to grow as a teacher, just like the pregnant body grows and changes.

One of my favorite aspects of teaching pregnant women is being a part of their support team.  I love to create and hold the space for them to come together to share their mutual experiences. After all, this may be the only time they get to be around other pregnant women. Class time becomes their sanctuary, letting them spread out, be themselves, share and gather information and share their common woes and celebrations as well. Read More…

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