Profile of a Yogi: Lindsey Wallace

This is the first in a series of features on YOHI Teacher Training Institute graduates and students. Stay tuned each week to learn more about how Teacher Training (TT) has helped these yogis learn, grow and blossom in our community and elsewhere!

“I love turning the world upside down and gaining a new perspective,” said Lindsey Wallace, who completed her 200-hour certification in August 2012 from Yoga on High’s Teacher Training Institute. It’s no wonder then, that one of her favorite yoga poses is sirsasana (headstand). Now living in New York City, Lindsey is a student, teacher and research assistant, earning her master’s degree in Clinical Psychology from Columbia University Teachers College. With a focus on Spirituality and Mind/Body Interventions, Lindsey continually has a chance to see things from a new perspective, whether it’s in the classroom or on the yoga mat.

Lindsey’s TT specialization was ashtanga, but she also teaches vinyasa and restorative yoga. She is currently using her certification to teach classes at Columbia University and Barnard College to staff, students and alumni. And in her spare time, she researches spirituality and positive psychology in the emerging adult population, mindfulness-based interventions for college female freshmen, and conducts interviews with families affected by 9/11.

Given her busy schedule, it’s no wonder she began practicing what she calls “Train Metta”—an informal metta meditation while riding the subway in New York. Lindsey said, “When I first moved to NYC, I put in my earbuds on the train, as I was modeling the behavior of almost every other New Yorker. After a few days, I made a conscious decision that I wanted to ‘live in the world’ and walk down the streets and ride the subway aware of my surroundings. What a novel concept! The metta practice then occurred quite naturally--I found myself wishing others good health, happiness, and well-being, and feeling filled up with joy in return. An NYC subway car is a microcosm of the entire world--every ride teaches you something new!”

Lindsey is also lucky enough to combine her yoga training and teaching with her work as a student and research assistant at Columbia. “The opportunity to teach yoga is one of the greatest gifts I have received. I love assisting students on their journey toward greater awareness and acceptance of their bodies and minds. I enjoy transmitting the practices that have been passed down over thousands of years, as well as adding my own insights and knowledge from other disciplines.” Lindsey noted that she is eternally grateful to Martha, Marcia, Linda, Tom and all of her fellow TTs for their guidance and support—her favorite thing about YOHI training that “there is so much wisdom and positive energy at YOHI, and I loved being a part of that community.”

Any words of advice to incoming or current TTs?  Start teaching early! “It’s so simple, yet challenging,” Lindsey said. “Begin by leading yourself through your practice with verbal instructions, then move onto friends (both novice and experienced yogis). I also recommend listening to ‘The Language of Yoga’ by Nicholai Bachman--you’ll learn asana names quickly and improve your pronunciation!”

When she’s not teaching yoga, conducting research, or going to school, Lindsey loves biking around the city, spending time with her cat Stellaluna and eating Jeni’s Brown Butter Almond Brittle.

Stay tuned next week for our next featured TT: Jennifer Gleichauf, owner of Nurture Yoga in Dublin, OH.

written by Kristy McCray
photos by Kristine Keller

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2 Responses to Profile of a Yogi: Lindsey Wallace
  1. Adrienne

    Lovely story about a lovely person 🙂

  2. Jean A. Anderson

    Remarkable insights! Two thumbs up! Well, Yoga states that we are conceived immaculate, unadulterated and whole and tries to re-secure our union with this truth. As we develop and travel through the inescapable tests of life, we structure frequently oblivious examples of defenses, cutting ourselves off from this indispensable reality.