Posts by: yogaonhigh

Changing the Paradigm with UZIT in Schools

By Janine Harris Degitz

Janine Harris DegitzThis past Fall, Susan Cunningham and I began offering Urban Zen Integrative Therapy™ (UZIT) oneday a week to the teachers, staff and administrators at a local elementary school in Central Ohio. The commitment in this school to progressive education and caring for the whole child is taking root in a new way. The administration’s support of UZIT says loud and clear to all of the staff of the school—you can’t take care of the children you serve unless you also take the time to care for yourself.

Through a generous grant from local donors, and as a community, we are setting down new self-care patterns at work. We are creating a place, within the workplace, for teachers and staff to pause and take 10-20 minutes out of their task-filled days of service to children to tend to their own well-being, which has shown remarkable results.

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This week as I walked down the hall with one staff member to our small room next to the often-lively library, she reflected; “I associate work with stress and anxiety, and it is wonderful to have a place at work to come to that is relaxing and neither stressful or anxiety producing. Thank you for being here, it’s making a huge difference.” This client noted pre-session stress and anxiety levels of 7 on a scale of 10, and left after our 15-minute session with self-assessment numbers of 2 and 3. Changes like this in our nervous systems are central to the possibility of changing our work environments, transforming this critical workplace, which serves our children, to one that cares about all people involved, as well as the purpose of their work.

It takes time to undo our cultural training to overextend ourselves in
our work and home life. It’s a challenge because our North American culture tends to value being busy all the time and carries busy-ness like a badge of honor. Therefore, we need to make it a conscious part of our daily life to pause, set down the to-do list and the phone, breathe, listen and be quiet.

The messages in our heads are often very loud, “I need to be in crisis to ask for help,” “I have to work harder in order to be valued or worthwhile,” or, as one teacher mentioned before our session, “Well, I guess I’m really doing OK, maybe I don’t need to take the time….” It’s radical to make self-care the norm so that we know when we are out of balance in the moment.

How would it be to have 28 pairs of children’s eyes staring at you and know that you have tools and the space to breathe. That you can come back to the moment, notice your breath and your body, and share your gifts with our youth from a place of wholeness. It only takes a few minutes to shift from overwhelmed and anxious to ready and able to meet the rest of your day.

Life doesn’t wait for us to be ready, it’s happening each and every moment. Building skills of self-care and self-awareness is how we re-tool ourselves to be the best we can be in our lives. As a friend recently told me, “Fold up your super-hero cape neatly in the bottom drawer of your dresser – it’s not needed anymore”.

Janine Harris Degitz 
lives in Clintonville with her family. For the past 25 years she has deepened her passion for living in harmony with the earth and community through supporting local farmers, fermenting food, teaching and sharing natural and sustainable beekeeping, Urban Zen Integrative Therapy and compassionate communication. All things that bring her back into connection with her own being, the earth, the food that nurtures us and the love, compassion and interconnectedness of life itself.

Janine became a certified Urban Zen Integrative Therapists in April, 2014 and became a staff mentor/ teacher for the Yoga on High Urban Zen training classes beginning in 2015.  Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) uses multiple modalities to address the symptoms and stress of everyday life. The modalities include gentle movements, restorative yoga positions, body awareness meditation, breath awareness practices, aromatherapy and Reiki.

 

 

 

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Meditation and Middle School Science

by Stephanie Estice

71 people talk about mind egoThe Radiance Sutras: 112 gateways to the yoga of wonder and delight 

by Lorin Roche, PhD
Sutra 71

People talk about mind and ego.
Let’s just drop this whole conversation.

Consider instead:
There is no mind.
There is no ego.

There is only the vivid reality
Of this surprising moment
At play, beckoning.

atom-1674878_1280 Pixabay CCOI remember the day in middle school science class when we learned about the vibration of atoms, and within them electrons, protons, and neutrons. We learned how these were the parts that resulted in solids, liquids, and gases. My science teacher’s voice faded into the background as I stared at my desk and imagined all the space in that “solid” which I couldn’t see. I gently touched the table; it felt solid. I looked at the air in the room. I almost didn’t dare, but I then looked at my hand. At this point, I was so focused on space, vibration and expansion, it was as if my teacher and the other students no longer existed, though I knew we were all still together in that science class and I could hear the teacher’s voice off in the distance. I felt fully immersed in my experience of that moment and, as my attention expanded to re-include my classmates and teacher and my experience of space in solid, I had a sense of shifted awareness.
Years later when I started a meditation practice as an adult, I thought I needed to learn something. Like so many, I felt meditation must be the answer to what was feeling out of control in my life -- my thoughts, my emotions. Life seemed to be running itself, in ways that weren’t comfortable, and I thought if I figured out this meditation thing, then I was sure my life would be perfect.

Now that I have spent many years practicing meditation, I feel like I’ve come full circle. All the variety of meditation practices which I’ve explored are simply revealing the possibilities of human experience, and how we have an opportunity in each moment to be with that experience of being human.

When I rest and trust in that which I already know, I can be with all that is happening, in and around me. As I look at the world around me, I can be open and have focus at the same time in a new way.

We all have experiences like this that we can share, and many of you may be nodding your head in recognition. And, at the same time, you may be wondering how did you get disconnected from what you know?

In classes, one of my favorite questions, often after we have experienced a brief meditation, is: “When do you experience Presence in your life -- that surprise of knowing ‘I am here, in and of this world, experiencing this moment’?” For years I asked this question many times in my private client work, too, and I would hear the same examples of human experience. I won’t write them here…you know the answer. If you’re not sure, ask a friend, a family member, or someone you admire. When you have your examples, seek opportunities for more. The more we see the opportunities for Presence in every moment, the more our lives reflect that experience we are seeking.

“…there is only the vivid reality of this surprising moment at play, beckoning.”

Stephanie Estice teaches meditation and mentors students and clients in private sessions. She can be found at Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute or onsite around central Ohio. For more information, look here or email here.

 

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December Calendar of Events

Holiday Hours:
Sunday, December 24, Christmas Eve: Closed
Monday, December 25, Christmas: Closed (except for Christmas Day Practice)
December 26 -- January 1: Holiday Break*
*No regularly scheduled open classes
*See schedule for special scheduled classes or workshops
*Short North Boutique limited hours:
December 26: 11a to 5p
December 27: 11a to 8p
December 28: 11a to 8p
December 29: 11a to 8p
December 30: 11a to 8p
December 31: 11a to 3p
January 1: 8:30a to 3p
January 1: New Year’s Day Classes
January 2: Open Class Schedule Resumes

Schedule Updates:
Grandview:
Thursday 12p Deep Release with Amy Lybrook
Saturday 11:45a Slow Flow Level 1 & 2 with Amy Lybrook

Workshops:
December 2 Sekoia Journey to Wellness Retreat Workshop with Karine Wascher
December 8-10 Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Training Michele Vinbury, Marybeth Hamilton, Marcia Miller
December 8 Ayurvedic Foundations with Breanna Mustard
December 9 Holiday Restorative with Marcia Miller
December 21 Holiday Restorative with Jenn Gebhart
December 17 Sekoia Aerial Restoratives with Dale Ann Gray
December 25 Christmas Day Practice with Lara Falberg at Grandview
January 1 New Year’s Day Classes:
9:00a to 11:00a NYD Mysore with Linda Chun & Correna Starbuck
10:00a to 12:00p NYD Hatha with Marcia Miller
11:00a to 12:45a NYD Sekoia Hike with Michele Vinbury at Offsite TBD
1:00p to 2:30p NYD Sekoia with Karine Wascher
4:00p to 5:30p NYD Vinyasa with Jeremy Grace at Grandview

Series Classes:
Upcoming January 2018 Series Classes click here

Upcoming Teacher Trainings:

200 Hour 9-Month Yoga Teacher Training (2018 March Weekend)
This program starts in March and meets one weekend a month. Additionally, the program includes a weekend orientation session to start the program, a philosophy weekend and a three-day silent retreat to finish.

**Save $500 if enrolled and paid in full by December 23, 2017. **

200 Hour TT Free Information Sessions:
Sunday, December 3rd from 11:45a to 12:30p at Yoga on High -- Short North
Wednesday, January 17th from 6:00p to 6:45p at Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute
Sunday, January 21st from 11:45a to 12:30p at Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

Pranayama Teacher Training with Linda Oshins
This seven-month training involves telephone conference calls every other week, one weekend workshop mid-way through the training, and one weekend workshop at the end. Program kicks off with a choice of phone calls, February 7 or 11, 2018.

Ayurveda Health Educator 1 (2018 March Evening Program)
The evening program is 11-months long from March 10, 2018 -- February 26, 2019. It meets Tuesdays from 6:00p-9:00p and includes three full weekend modules.

Ayurveda Program Free Information Sessions:
December 14, 2017 at 6:30p -- Conference Call
January 13, 2018 from 12:15p to 1:15p at the Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

300 Hour Teacher Training
1 to 3 Year Customizable Program and Rolling Enrollment
For questions or more information contact: linda@yogaonhigh.com

300 Hr TT Free Information Sessions:
Saturday, January 20th from 2:30p to 3:30p at the Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute

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November Calendar of Events

Schedule Updates:
Sunday 10:15a Kids Yoga with Kristin Deam

November Workshops:
November 3-5 Reiki Level 1 & 2 Intensive with Linda Oshins
November 5 Enso YOFO Tattoo event with Kevin Stress & Curt Everett
November 11-12 Reiki Master Attunement and Teacher Training with Marcia Miller
November 17 Jason Crandell Teacher Day – Sold Out
November 18 -19 Jason Crandell Weekend Workshop
November 23 Sekoia Thanksgiving Day Practice with Jasmine Grace at Yoga on High -- Grandview
November 25 Sekoia Spirit Journey: Dragon with Michele Vinbury

Upcoming Workshops:
December 8-10 Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Training
December 9 & 21 Holiday Restoratives

Series Classes:
11:30a Sundays, starting November 5 6-Week Advanced Ashtanga with Tom Griffith
11:15a Tuesdays, starting November 7 Mommy & Baby @ Step by Step -- Westerville with Janet Braden
4:30p Tuesdays, staring November 7 6-Week Hatha Level 1 & 2 @ All Life Center -- Powell with Melanie Miller
7:00p Tuesdays, starting November 7 Yoga for Runners @ Step by Step -- Westerville with Marcy Freed

Upcoming Teacher Trainings:
Pranayama Teacher Training with Linda Oshins
This seven-month training involves telephone conference calls every other week, one weekend workshop mid-way through the training, and one weekend workshop at the end. Program kicks off with a choice of phone calls, February 7 or 11, 2018.

Ayurveda Health Educator 1 (2018 March Evening Program)
The evening program is 11-months long from March 10, 2018 -- February 26, 2019. It meets Tuesdays from 6:00p-9:00p and includes three full weekend modules.

We invite you to meet us at one of our upcoming free information session.
November 12, 2017 from 5:30p to 6:30p Yoga on High Teacher Training Institute
December 14, 2017 at 6:30p -- Conference Call

200 Hour 9-Month Yoga Teacher Training (2018 March Weekend)
This program starts in March and meets one weekend a month. Additionally, the program includes a weekend orientation session to start the program, a philosophy weekend and a three-day silent retreat to finish.

300 Hour Teacher Training
1 to 3 Year Customizable Program and Rolling Enrollment
For questions or more information contact: linda@yogaonhigh.com

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Gratitude Guru Heart Opening Flow by Lara Falberg

Lara Falberg Heart Opening SequenceGratitude Guru Heart Opening SequenceA simple, effective, accessible, and lovely way to begin the practice from a perspective of gratitude and not taking anything for granted.

  • Begin in Supta Baddha Konasana, propped. Turn three-part breath into a gratitude practice. Fill the belly with gratitude for the fullness of your life, the ability to draw breath, and sustenance to sustain life. Fill the ribs that protect our hearts with love for everyone around you and love for yourself. Fill the chest with even more oxygen and feel the burst of gratitude for the life you’ve created and all the loving thoughts, ideas, and creations an oxygen-rich brain can develop. Let it out just as slowly, giving yourself permission to release old stories that aren’t true and don’t position you towards gratitude.

Cat/Cow, lingering anywhere that feels especially good, mentally saying the words ‘thank-you’ for the way your body will move and the space you’re creating

  • Child’s Pose. If the knees are wide, take the opportunity to melt your heart towards the earth, saying thank-you for the support. If knees together, saying thank you to your legs for support and for working so well on your behalf.
  • Supported Virasana. Place the hands behind the head with the thumbs supporting the stem of your neck, offering yourself support and your lungs a chance to billow more openly. Say thank-you to all the people in your life and environments that offer so much enrichment.

For more gratitude practices this month, find the full list here.

 

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October Calendar of Events

Schedule Updates
Monday 1:00p Urban Zen with Jenn Gebhart
Sunday 10:15a Kids Yoga with Staff

October Workshops
October 1 Gratitude Guru October Challenge
October 13–15 Kino Macgregor Weekend Workshops
October 14 Diwali, Festival of Lights Yoga Class with Anne Weidinger
October 14 Bend & Brew with Jeremy Grace
October 20 Ray Long Anatomy Weekend
October 21 Sekoia Spirit Journey: Owl with Michele Vinbury
October 22 Abundant Columbus with Sarah Dryer

Upcoming Workshops:
November 3-5 Reiki Level 1 & 2 Intensive with Linda Oshins
November 11-12 Reiki Master Attunement and Teacher Training with Marcia Miller
November 18-19 Jason Crandell
December 8-10 EMBER Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Teacher Training
December 9 & 21 Holiday Restoratives

Series Classes:
Hatha Beginner Series
5:45p Mondays, starting October 2 Hatha Dynamic New Beginners @ TTI with Marcia Miller
2:00p Sundays, starting October 15 Hatha Beginner Series @ Grandview with Holly Moretti

iRest Yoga Nidra Meditation Series
6:15p Wednesdays, starting October 4 iRest Yoga Nidra Series with Michele Vinbury

Prenatal
6:00p Mondays, starting October 2 Prenatal @ Step by Step – Westerville with Julie Carpenter
5:45p Thursdays, starting October 5 Prenatal with Mary Sinclair
12:00p Saturdays, starting October 7 Prental @ Step by Step – Westerville with Julie Carpenter
7:30p Mondays, starting October 9 Prenatal @ TTI with Jenn Gebhart

Ashtanga Foundations & Advanced Series
7:30p Tuesdays, starting October 10 6-week Ashtanga Foundations with Tom Griffith
3:00p Sundays, starting October 15 6-week Ashtanga Foundations with Correna Starbuck
11:30a Sundays, starting October 29 6-week Advanced Ashtanga with Tom Griffith

Specialty
9:30a Sundays, starting October 8 Introduction to Qigong @ Grandview with Kevin Eigel
4:30p Thursdays, starting October 19 6-week Slow Burn Vinyasa Level 1 & 2 @ ALC – Powell with Marcy Freed
7:00p Tuesdays, starting November 7 Yoga for Runners @ Step by Step –Westerville with Marcy Freed

MS Series
4:00p Mondays, starting October 2 MS Yoga with Jenn Gebhart
12:00p Saturday, starting October 7 MS Yoga with Jenn Gebhart

Upcoming Teacher Trainings:
Pranayama Teacher Training with Linda Oshins
Begins February 7, 2018

300 Hour Teacher Training
1 to 3 Year Customizable Program and Rolling Enrollment
For questions or more information contact: linda@yogaonhigh.com

 

 

 

 

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10 Key Values the Best Yoga Teachers Possess

I’m driven and ambitious when I train teachers. I’m ridiculously passionate about yoga. And, I’m opinionated about the need for education to have clarity, consistency, cohesiveness, and practicality.

And so, I drill technique and teach alignment and philosophical details that will help teachers become better at teaching asana classes: I want them to graduate having a more detailed understanding of how the body works. I want them to know more accurate verbal cues and precise manual adjustments. I want my graduates to create sequences that follow a logical, progressive arc and educate their students. I want them to understand the philosophical container of yoga, where yoga comes from, and how to communicate the ancient wisdom of yoga to students in a modern setting.

But, if I’m being honest, I aspire to teach my advanced trainees more than that. I take it for granted that my graduates will be able teach a kick-* class. For a yoga teacher, this is just being good at your job.

And so, there are four questions that tug at me throughout each and every training I conduct:

– What are the core values and essential skills that I want graduates of my programs to embody?

– What type of teacher and professional do I want to help my graduates become?

– How are my graduates different after my programs than before my programs?

– Am I just adding to their bank of knowledge and technique, or am I imparting qualities that go beyond the ability to teach a good class?

To answer the questions above, I’ve come up with the essential values I hope to convey to my advanced training graduates. I believe these values honor the practice and teaching of yoga.

Speak Up—Not Down—To Your Students

Your students are not just in class to workout. Yes, they want to move and use their bodies. It’s undeniable that they might even want to workout and sweat. But, your students have taken their shoes off and they’re in a yoga class. This means that they also want to learn to move more skillfully, safely, effectively, and intelligently. Your students want to learn how to manage their anxieties, fears, and other stresses. They want to learn how to pause, reflect, and find happiness in the life they are living.

Treat your students as though they are teachable, sound people who are capable of learning from this tradition. Assume that they are in your class to learn about themselves, to feel embodied, and to improve the quality of their lives. So, speak up to your students, not down to them. Teach them yoga while you work them out (if that’s the type of class you teach). Students who aren’t interested in learning these dimensions of yoga will simply move on and find a different practice that meets their needs.

Be Critical Thinkers and Engaged Practitioners

I share this passage with my trainees in every setting. It’s from Chogyam Trungpa’s Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism. He writes:

“There is a saying in Tibetan Scriptures that ‘knowledge must be burned, hammered and beaten like pure gold.’ So, when you receive spiritual instruction from the hands of another, you do not take it uncritically, but you burn it, you hammer it, and you beat it until the bright, dignified color of gold appears.”

I remind my graduates—nearly every day—that they shouldn’t take my teaching as singular or infallible truth. I want them to be critical thinkers. I want my students to listen, test, and experiment. If what I teach my students is true and accurate, it will stand up under scrutiny. If it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny, then it’s my job to reconsider and revise the teaching. I want my graduates to have the confidence to maintain this spirit.

Continue to Grow and Revise

I didn’t know everything about yoga twenty years ago when I started teaching. I don’t know everything about yoga today. In twenty years, I won’t know everything about yoga. No one—not guruji this or panditji that—knows everything there is to know about the massive scope of yoga and the human experience. We need, as a community, to embrace the reality that many teachings—from time-to-time—need to updated based on experience.

Do we get rid of the ancient teachings that have stood the test of time? No. Let’s continue to uphold and cultivate everything that stands up to the test of time. But, let’s not continue to do Triangle Pose a certain way if it’s hurting our sacrum simply because that’s the way it was taught to us. No. Let’s stay up to date. Let’s learn along the way. Let’s be open, honest, and willing to revise our teaching based on our deepening understanding of this tradition and how it affects modern practitioners.

Keep Your Teaching Real and Relevant

The vast majority of the yoga-practicing population is never going to press into Handstand. That doesn’t mean you can’t incorporate this work into your classes, especially if you’re passionate about inversions.

But, Krishnamacharya had a saying: “Ninety percent of the benefit of yoga comes from the simplest ten percent of the practice.” To me, this means that in addition to the big, challenging stuff that’s engaging and exciting and Instagram-worthy, we need to remind our students that doing foundational postures with skill and focus creates a long-term, valuable impact. Let’s continue to build content that is relevant and accessible for our students—not just show the content that is inspirational.

Develop a Point of View Without Minimizing Other Points of View

I believe that everyone has experiences and beliefs that shape their values, worldview, and point of view as a teacher. I also believe that having a point of view as a teacher is natural, normal, and necessary. I have a point of view about, well, just about everything in yoga from the rotation of the bottom arm in Triangle Pose, to the motion of the inner-border of the scapulae in Down Dog, to the components of Patanjali’s teaching that are most relevant to a modern yogi. My beliefs are substantiated by experience. But, this doesn’t mean that my point of view on any given topic is the only valid point of view.

If you take professionals from any trade, you will find that they disagree on countless particulars. If you take ten economists and show them the same data, they may each come to slightly different conclusions. I want my graduates to have the depth, discernment, and confidence to stand behind what they teach without condemning other perspectives.

Be an Advocate For Your Students

I believe that yoga teachers should always have their students’ best interests in mind. And, when appropriate, we should advocate for our student’s wellbeing by encouraging them to find support outside of the yoga tradition.

Suzuki Roshi, the author of Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, said, “Teaching Zen is not like training dogs.” I believe the same to be true when it comes to teaching yoga. If someone may benefit from therapeutic modalities that are not part of yoga, we should advocate for them. Some students may benefit from physical therapy and orthopedic attention. Some students may benefit from various forms of psychological support. Some students will take medicine because medicine helps them be well.

We should be opening doors in students’ belief systems, not closing them. We live in a modern world with many different forms of help. Let’s embrace them, not diminish them.

Do Not Make Prescriptive Claims

I want my graduates to understand the importance of these three words: “I don’t know.”

Is yoga super good for you? Yes.
Do we want everyone to practice yoga forever and always? Yes!
Do we know why your back hurts, why your shoulder hurts, or why you’ve been having trouble getting out of bed lately? No. No, we don’t.

Yoga teachers should not put themselves in the position of making claims, performing a diagnosis, or creating prescriptive practices, no matter how well-intentioned they may be. Yoga is inherently therapeutic, but this doesn’t mean that we’re conducting therapy.

Our job is to teach students yoga that works for their body, not fix an ailment. We want to help our students be well. We want to understand how to minimize injuries through effective technique and sequencing. We want to see and understand bodies so that we can help students modify and avoid future suffering. We want to teach good, solid yoga that is relevant to our students’ needs. All of these things often produce a therapeutic effect. This is how yoga works. And, this is very different than telling someone with knee pain and dysfunction that all they need to do is strengthen their quads. We need to understand and respect this boundary.

You Are a Teacher and You’re Teaching a Subject

Yoga is a subject. It’s a body of work. It’s a living tradition. It’s a discipline. It includes anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, philosophy, educational pedagogy, sequencing, manual communication, verbal communication, content creation, and more.

Yoga teachers deal with every component of the human condition and the timeless drive toward transcending the human condition. This means that your job is not as simple as showing up for 60, 75, or 90 minutes and helping people feel better. Sure, this is part of the job. But, there’s something much bigger at play here: Yoga teachers are educators, not just facilitators of flow.

If you were teaching math, you’d want people to learn math. If you were teaching history, you’d want people to learn the themes, concepts, and experiences that different communities have undergone for various eras. If you were teaching photography, you’d want people to understand light, shadow, and composition. As yoga teachers, we’re helping students gain depth, insight, and skill in every facet of the human experience that yoga touches.

Develop a Curriculum

It’s difficult to teach if you’re not clear what you’re trying to teach. Similarly, it’s difficult to learn if you’re not sure what you’re trying to learn. This is why teachers of every single subject under the sun have curriculums. This is why teachers of preschool, kindergarten, primary school, middle school, high school, and university have curriculums. This is why I believe that graduates of my programs should be developing a curriculum. I believe that yoga teachers are accountable to their students for providing them with an education. Developing a curriculum helps clarify the learning and skill development process for our students. It also helps teachers refine and articulate their values and beliefs.

You are Part of a Community

You are not alone.

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Journey to the Strongest Version of Myself: Marina Zahan

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Acts of Karma Yoga Love during Philosophy Weekend

What a ride…the Yoga On High TT program has turned me inside + out in about 13 different ways.

While studying at OSU, I was on a pretty stark path of what I thought I wanted my life to become. I jumped thru hoop after hoop at a young age to get ahead professionally—efforts entirely motivated by gaining approval from my peers, professors, cohorts + (especially) parents.

I was seriously, absolutely, completely, miserable.

This teacher training program has taught me what it means to be the strongest version of myself. It has opened (almost too many) doors. The mentorship aspect is where I felt the strongest resonance + support from this program. Team camaraderie was ubiquitous to say the least. We met to play, practice, offer support in times of heartache + stress, and engaged in new activities such as archery, tai chi + rock climbing.

The TT program granted me a sense of community never felt before. My gratitude will forever reach into the arms of Michele Vinbury. the crusader of this program, and extend to all those who work endless hours to create the most thoughtfully crafted training I have ever experienced.

Yoga On High is a highly acclaimed studio + teaching institute in the midwest. This 200hr TT program flourishes as it offers one-of-a-kind experiences such as: the 2-day Silent retreat, in depth anatomy classes & other modalities such as Pranayama, iRest, Ayurveda, Meditation, Yin & more.

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Silent Retreat -- sure we couldn’t talk.. no one said we couldn’t giggle

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Silent Retreat

Our next 200 Hour Teacher Training program begins September 22nd.  For more information, join us at our upcoming Free Info Session Sunday, September 10th from 11:45a to 12:30p with Michele Vinbury at Yoga on High. To apply or for questions, contact Breanna at applications@yogaonhigh.com

Watch Yoga on High Teacher Training video here.

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Update on Jerry Marcom

Dear Friends,

I know you have been wanting more news about Jerry so here is the latest update. When I asked him what he wanted to share he said to tell you that he now has a big hole in his head.  Lots of space in there these days. Jerry has been recovering from his brain surgery very well these last few weeks.  His physical recovery from the surgery is going well and the PT evaluating him in order to leave the hospital wanted to take his picture to show what she wished all her patients could do.  He was doing a bit of yoga in the hall, keeping things moving as we yogis like to do.  He has also been able to continue to offer very meaningful rituals to honor Martha’s life including getting some of her ashes up onto Mt Shasta with the help of Tom Griffith and many others. He has had time to make beautiful heartfelt, and in some cases miraculous connections with friends, family and people showing up from his past. He has been able to be medically useful by participating in a study requiring a series of MRIs that may help doctors to better understand these types of tumors. He and family have figured out what help he needs to stay at home and he is very relieved and grateful to have that in place. He even took time to come to our Urban Zen training session and support the new trainees. He has been able to return to Morning Mysore with a very modified practice. His doctors explained his limitations and he and dear friend Rhonda Kuster worked out what that meant for a daily routine. This practice brings him much pleasure and balance and I’m guessing that others in the room are inspired to see him there doing what he can. He has recently been able to spend time at his cabin at Lake Logan--long a refuge and sanctuary for him. 

He will start radiation soon. Doctors know that the type of tumor he has responds well to radiation and we hope that is true in his case. He will be taking an oral chemotherapy at the same time as well. He wants you to know he is doing well, but is not able to return to all the previous activities he did before the surgery. He continues to need lots of rest and quiet. He is not driving and not going out much. He sends his love.

As for ways you can help: Do your own practice and dedicate the practice to Jerry and everyone else in need. Send Reiki and blessings his way.  Cards and notes can be sent to him care of Yoga on High. 

Jerry and his whole family are grateful for your love and support.  

Thank you so much,
Marcia 

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Journey to Self-Acceptance: Shelley Brunicardi

FullSizeRenderYoga found me during a particularly challenging part of my life.  Although I had only been practicing for about a year, I decided to attend the informational meeting for teacher training at YOHI. When Michele Vinbury stated that the YOHI philosophy was based on “radical self-acceptance,” I knew it was the place for me; I was in need of some serious self-acceptance.

It wasn’t until I was partially through the training that I realized just how little I knew about yoga. All of my experience had been in gyms. I knew no Sanskrit and little about yoga philosophy. With the guidance and support of my mentor, all the wonderful teachers in the program, the teachers at YOHI public classes, and my fellow students, I did my best to keep my ego in check and I persevered.

At times I questioned if I should have waited to take the training. As I reflect on it, however, I know the timing was just when it needed to be. I have continued to work on my own personal practice and my teaching. I teach four to five classes per week now with full confidence in the training I received at YOHI.

Most importantly, I have learned to trust myself, accept myself and believe in the “perfect” timing of all things, even when the timing does not seem so “perfect.” I would recommend to anyone with that pull in their heart to trust the timing, trust their heart and accept themselves just as they are.

IMG_0130Shelley completed her 200 Hour Teacher Training and EMBER 100 hour Trauma Sensitive certification through Yoga on High. She enjoys practicing yoga with her children and currently teaches at the Hilliard YMCA, Prairie Township Community Center and her children’s school. She teaches Vinyasa yoga, Pilates, senior & teen yoga. She is passionate about helping her students find strength, and flexibility in their bodies, while also offering tools to assist them in finding a deeper connection to themselves, each other, and to rediscover a part of themselves they may have lost along the journey of life.

Our next 200 Hour Teacher Training program begins September 22nd.  For more information, join us at our upcoming Free Info Session Sunday, September 10th from 11:45a to 12:30p with Michele Vinbury at Yoga on High. To apply or for questions, contact Breanna at applications@yogaonhigh.com

Watch Yoga on High Teacher Training video here.

 

 

 

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